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Reading Information

posted Oct 18, 2015, 12:20 PM by Christine Roman

As Dr. Seuss stated, “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you'll go.” Becoming a successful reader is one of the main goals of our school!  Some students seem to be natural readers while other students need extra time and support to become efficient readers.  Reading is like any sport, the more you practice, the better you will become!  With the way our world is changing and how technology and careers are evolving, reading continues to be an essential skill.  With the demand for schools to have all students “college and career ready” by graduation, our reading targets have increased. It is now the expectation to have all kindergartners going into first grade as readers!

One way to measure a student’s reading level and the level of a book’s complexity is using The Lexile Framework for Reading. The Lexile Framework involves a scale for measuring the reading ability of an individual and the text complexity of materials he or she encounters. The Lexile scale is like a thermometer, except, rather than measuring temperature, the Lexile Framework measures a text’s complexity and a reader’s skill level. 

Here is a chart of some current popular series and some classics and their Lexile range.


Title/Series

Author

Genre

Lexile Range

Magic Tree House (older stories)

Mary Pope Osborne

Fantasy

230-580

Magic Tree House            (newer stories with science and history themes)

Mary Pope Osborne

Historical or realistic fantasy

590-800

Junie B. Jones

Barbra Parks

Fiction/Non-fiction

310-410

Goosebumps

R. L. Stine

Horror/fantasy/thriller

360-570

Matt Christopher Books

Matt Christopher

Sports

450-930

Amber Brown

Paula Danziger

Realistic fiction

530-760

The 39 Clues

Many authors

Adventure

560-830

“I Survived” series

Lauren Tarshis

Historical fiction

590-730

Little House on the Prairie

Laura Ingalls Wilder

Fiction

620-1030

Black Stallion

Walter Farley

Fiction

680-920

Percy Jackson & The Olympians

Jeff Kinney

Fantasy/Adventure/Fiction

710-990

Harry Potter

J. K. Rowling

Fantasy

880-1030

Diary of a Wimpy Kid

Jeff Kinney

Graphic/Realistic Fiction/Comedy

910-1060

The Pearl

John Steinbeck

Folk tale

1000-1150

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Victor Hugo and John Sturrock

Haunting drama

1340-1450


As states adopted using the Common Core standards, and with some national reports stating that our students are not prepared for college and careers, guidelines have been put together to help educators and parents.  Here is one chart which guides teachers and students regarding student Lexile scores:

Grade Band

Current Lexile Band

“Stretch” Lexile Band

K-1

N/A

N/A

2-3

450-730L

420L-820L

4-5

640-850L

740-1010L

6-8

860-1010L

925-1185L

9-10

960-1120L

1050-1335L

11-CCR

1070-1220L

1185-1385L


So what can parents do to help their children become solid readers?

·         Make it a routine to read each day:  This reading can include:  parents reading to children at bedtime, children reading to parents, siblings or self, the family dog, stuffed animals, or face-timing with relatives!

·         Go to the local library and sign up for a library card:  Librarians can guide children in selecting books they might enjoy or a series they might get hooked on.  Visiting the local library will provide the opportunity to read all those books in a favorite series without it impacting your wallet.

·         Model and have conversations around your own reading:  Whether it be a magazine, newspaper, book or article on the Internet, share with your children what you are learning through reading.

·         Be an active participant in your child’s education:  Check your child’s backpack every night, communicate and check in with your child’s teacher, become involved with the school’s PTO and celebrate both the large and small academic gains.  Teachers are aware of your child’s Lexile level and can assist in selecting “just right” books your child may enjoy.

·         From the NH Humane Society’s website—Cat Tales:  Children in grades K-6 who are able to read at any level may come into the shelter to read to the cats, when accompanied by an adult partner volunteer. Cat Tales will encourage reading, improve skills and help our cats by offering quiet, kind and loving human interaction and companionship.  Bring your own book or choose one from our cat library.  One short initial introduction with a volunteer docent is required.  Register for the program with the volunteer coordinator.

Please feel free to reach out to me or your child’s classroom teacher, if you would like more information.

Have a great weekend

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